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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)
's right, shep. you heard the president citing both of them, talking a lot about civil rights and really casting himself as someone who wants to carry on their civil rights legacies. i think the broadered message of that what it means in the current political environment is he made very clear that he just didn't win the last election. he believes he has a mandate. he believes he is going to be very aggressive in the days ahead. he was talking about taking action on climate change, immigration reform and at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits. he also gave a very rigorous defense of entitlement spending, take a listen. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. [ applause ] they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. [ applause ] >> now, interesting as well that the white house put out a tweet about another part of the speech where he said, quote: our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and
for everybody. he also talked about the civil rights movement. i think the idea behind this of s of basic equality and opportunity. our country is founded on those principles. when he talked about immigration today, again, it was opportunity and equality and he's going to fight for that just as he had his entire career he's going to do that for the next four years. his hope-- as we had the national day of service yesterday sds that ordinary americans get involved. get engaged with their country whether through volunteerism, whether through letting their voices be heard as we try to pursue legislation in washington it's a spirit of for engagement and that was a big part of what the president was saying today. we don't have to solve all of our problems but let's not put the short-term political interests ahead of the american people. >> schieffer: ms. jarrett, it's bob schieffer here. i wanted to ask you, because you do know the president so well. republicans i keep hearing say, well, they think the president doesn't like them. they say he doesn't like politics. that he doesn't like to get
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
do we do with our civil liberty rights? and what do we do with our troop levels? there are a lot of issues that could have divided us and we had the type of debate that i think was in the best interest of the united states senate and cleated that bill in -- and we completed that bill in a timely way. i think the way the two of you were able to come forward, there are a lot of other committees -- i serve on the senate foreign relations committee, we talked today during -- yesterday during -- and senator mccain you're also on that committee -- we talked to secretary clinton. wouldn't it be nice to get a state department authorization bill on the floor of the united states senate? mr. mccain: it's a disgrace that we haven't, in how many years? mr. cardin: it's been a long tievmentime. i haven't been in the senate since that happened. we have a better opportunity now. if our committee can mark up a defense authorization -- maybe it'll take a week or two, and you're right, maybe we'll have to work on friday, saturday, over the weekend to get it done. we should do that. but we now have
become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as a result of legalized abortion in the last four decades. 55 million. this makes up about a fix of our current adulation in the united states of america. even the center for disease control and prevention reported that about one in five people are not allowed to live annually in the united states because of abortion. abortion truly is the human rights abuse of today. [applause] and abortion is not good for women. experience, science, and research continue to show what common sense already tells us. abortion takes the life of a baby and wounds its mother and father. it is a somber moment. and yet, i believe that we are seeing s
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
obama, "the bridge," talks about how he grew out of the civil rights movement, led by martin luther king. you write in the book, david, that race has been at the core of president obama's story. but it's not been in the foreground of his presidency. >> that's true. he's gotten some criticism for that from some bloack leaders. he views his presence in the white house is essential. and everything he can do, whether it's improving the economy or keeping the united states safe, improves the lives of all americans. he's very wary of being the president of black america. he's insistent on being the president of the united states. and sometimes, that's caused him difficulty with certain black leaders. cornell west is one. there's others. >> and you said the president blames his americanism. what did you mean by that? >> president obama is very clear, he has the opportunity to represent all of america. he realizes that that history helps him lead the entire country. and so, he's claimed his america is not simply as black america. >> i was just going to say. this is also the 150th anniversary her
inauguration coverage. i'm soledad o'brien. let's get to james clyburn, veteran of the civil rights movement to talk about inauguration day. >> nice to be here. >> our pleasure. we've heard about the two tables th bibles that president obama will be sworn in with. i'm curious to know what you think about the cyclical nature. 50 years ago, march on washington, 50 years later, a black president is being sworn in for a second term. do you -- >> right. >> is it an indication that there have been some big steps toward progress in this country? >> sure. sure. big steps. but many, many steps left to go. all of us are aware that this president came into office, like the 40th year, and a whole lot of things haven't happened, and he is -- he has been met with some really tough times. not just the reaction to him, but because of the challenges that the country faces and i believe that so much of what president obama has confronted was forecast by martin luther king jr. >> what do you mean? >> take health care, for instance. to me, one of the most important speeches ever made by king had to do with heal
will lead us in the invocation. >> the farmer chair of the naacp, widow of slain civil rights leader edgar medgar evers 50 years ago this year. >> america, we are here, our nation's capital, on this day, january 21st, 2013, the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama, we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders, the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces; blessings upon all who contribute to the essence of the american spirit, the american dream, the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, womankind allows us to be. this is the promise of america as we sing the words of belief, this is my country, let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may the inherent dignity and inalienable rights of every woman, man, boy and girl be honored. may all your people, especially the least of these, flourish in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington, we celebrate the spirit o
with civil rights just generally human rights and i think you see coalitions building that you didn't see in the past. people who didn't necessarily see lbgt rights as being on par with other rights. >> right. he has changed the conversation that fair is fair. >> fair is fair -- >> stephanie: no you wrote this. you had a great piece in the "the advocate" about this. the american people -- even if some people have a little -- i don't know if i really like gays, it's still fair is fair. and this is not fair and not equal. >> yeah, exactly. there's still a little squeakiness from some people but i still got a little bit of a you people vibe from some people yesterday, but you can tell that they are growing in their understanding of what is fair, what is equal. >> stephanie: right. >> and that notion of fairness is expanding to include factors that people hadn't considered in the past. gender identity is one of those things that we are going to have to tackle. >> i suspect scalia was instrumental in that. god, dad. i have no idea why she talks like a valley girl. oh, go
to the left. >> as a civil rights issue of. >> that's right. he talked about global climate change and how we will attack that. immigration reform. by the way, there is jay-z and beyonce. >> by the way, she looks fantastic. >> moving on quickly. she is an incredibly beautiful woman. megyn: i defended him when he said it as well. [laughter] [talking over each other] >> i was just saying that i think both of you have points well taken. pillars in the eyes of the democrats and liberals of the american social progress in american society. he was also advancing some items which were not well established one can say he's the president, he got elected, he's got a mandate. but he wasn't saying that he was going to meet republican pathway. >> the president and the vice president with the official signing. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> thank you very much. [applause] megyn: we received about a dozen e-mails from our folks and viewers elaborating on what the crypt area is. it is called that because george washington was supposed to be buried there. but he was not because his fa
be there -- >> 70s? >> king would be there with all the other civil rights leaders who are in that moment. >> getting back to what you were saying, rachel, about the corporate profits, you know, the president believes in wall street. he doesn't want to be alien to wall street. he believes it is a vital part of our capitolistic system. he believes that government has a responsibility not to leave people behind and he also believes that those who have enjoyed the fruits out of our system should pay their fair share. and defining that fair share is going to be done by the population and the mood of the country and what we can do as a country to fix our finances. but he has been an allie to wall street. and he has tried to develop friends on wall street, which has been extremely hard for him, but if he can get these corporations to loosen up their profits and to hire people, then a lot of things would turn around in a heartbeat in this country. getting companies to invest here is one of his priorities. >> there's former president jimmy carter and his wife. immediately before them, as you migh
is the country's oldest civil rights group joining a lawsuit against the city of new york? we'll tell you, then a little bit later this hour, why some kentucky insiders are warning ashley judd away from a senate run. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ ♪ ♪ tossing and turning have given way to sleeping. where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep. and lunesta®(eszopiclone) can help you get there. like it has for so many people before. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. as
. >> absolutely. the civil rights movement created the possibility for barack obama to become president and i think he's ever mindful of that. i think that's where that community organizing comes in him. he knows that communities create the power. you think about the gay rights movement, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, this is all part of who he is and i think it's part of american history. when i look at american history, those movements are critical in transforming our attitudes about ourselves and about one another. and that's where real change takes place. lincoln said, you control public sentiment, controls everything. even if they can't control my voice. >> sometimes when historians try to speak too much in the course of one inaugural weekend, this is what happens. we're going to allow doris rest her voice for a second. you saw when we were talking a motorcade and you'd be forgiven for thinking there's the president on the move from the white house. it was not. first of all, you can't swing a dead cat without hit ago motorcade this weekend in washington. that was just t
, they waited for their civil rights leader, senator henry marsh to leave town to vote on the gerrymander calling bill. getting comments on beyonce. bashrbara says she is gorgeous and talented. her voice inspires. leave her alone. >> bill: no. >> find us on twitter @bp show. >> i am disappointed. congressman, tuesday morning, yesterday morning, i was gushing all over what a phenomenal job beyonce did. >> don't tell me james taylor -- i thought he sounded awful good for his age. great voice. >> he did. >> he was live. >> right? >> thank god. >> did you recommends she was lip synching? i was looking at her. >> you saw the front. do you meet in a phone booth? >> the largest in congress bigger than the united states senate. >> no kidding. >> yeah. >> get everybody to go to meet in washed. >> they are being progressive >>>. >> like herding cats. you can't do it. >> so what impact do you feel you can have on this congress given john boehner and the tea party couldn't get anything done? >> politics in lining up votes and taking positions is all pressure. it'
, daughter of the civil rights leader joins us today. your father's personal bible is used in the swearing in today, along with a bible that belongsed to abraham lincoln. tell me about your father's bible. >> that bible is at least 59 years of age, because in it are markings. such as 5-10-54. he was using this as a bible to meditate and pray and prepare himself for leadership in the church. very tattered. we did a little repairing on it, restoration, so it wouldn't fall apart when the president places his hand on it. >> that would be a bad thing to happen in the middle of the inauguration ceremony. i know you are preparing to speak at ebenezer church today, because, of course, what a great coincidence of timing, today we also celebrate your father's legacy as well, on the same day we inaugurate a president. what will you talk about? how do the two things intersect for you? >> first and foremost, the fact that the president is using daddy's bible is heart warming for me. my father was first and foremost a preacher, pastor, it reminds people of that. that is one of the things i will stress t
legislation that kennedy had introduced that was stalled, that really wasn't going to pass civil rights, the tax cut bill, and in an instant johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very very very much. >> last fall caro took part in the library of congress book festival on the national mall. it's clear he has made johnson come alive for many readers. >> do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him. you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying look what he is doing now. >> he got excited talking about johnson's rise to power as we turn to the final book he is writing now about johnson's president and vietnam, his demeanor has suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon a
and you have a candidate who said i would do this day vote against the civil rights act. >> john: that was rand paul. i think rand paul is like rick santorum in that he's not running for president but for higher public speaking fees for the rest of his life. it will be hillary against chris christie, a new york senator against a new jersey governor. his views are opposite of most of america. we know over 70% favor abortion rights. chris christie does not. do you think people would realize even a guy they like can have policies they don't like or is charisma more important than ideology? >> is that a trick question? >> john: no, it's a very real question. look at george w. bush. >> we love charisma and we love politicians with swagger. he has done good things with new jersey. you drive through and it even smells better. >> john: who doubt, and who cannot cheer what he has done for sandy victims. >> and the police forces, they love him too. >> john: and we could use that tunnel to manhattan as well. >> to predict anything about what chris christie's bigger play is on the national s
is not through. apologies. >> civil rights leader, merl the e evers who committedded her life to extend our nation's founding principles. mrs. evers will lead us in the invocation. shepard: she is the naacp's mississippi field secretary in 1963 when he was gunned down in the driveway of his jackson, mississippi home, and she carries forward his legacy. merle evers williams. >> america, we are higher here. our nation's capitol. on this day, january the 21st, 2013, the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama. we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders. the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces. blessings upon all who contribute to the essence of the american spirit, the american dream. the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, womankind allows us to be. this is the promise of america. as we sing the words of belief, this is my country, let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may the inherent dignity and inalienable rights o
, they remember the fight and struggle led by martin luther king and other people during the civil rights era to break through america's history of racism, of segregation, of people being marginalized. king lead to a lot of what we know now as historic legislation, the civil rights act, the voting rights act, the fair housing act. so there is a legacy that king left the benefit it and created the conditions under which president obama could even be elected to you do not have the voting rights act, you do not have black elected officials did you do not have the black vote -- a voting turnout that ultimately becomes critical in the 1990's, 2000, and of course in 2008, even in 2012. there is a long legacy. president obama himself acknowledges that he stands on those shoulders. not just the shoulders of former presidents that he talks about, but also the civil rights leaders. so it is significant that this is being held on martin luther king's holiday. and, of course, he is the president that is there when the martin luther king memorial actually comes about and is put up here in washington, d.c.
into little rock. not into berlin, but little rock to enforce desegregation, he signed the first civil rights law since the civil war. he hardly spoke about that in the second inaugural. he mentioned it, but hardly. i think these presidents have no idea what they're about to encouldn'ter. >> and outside events end up shaping the legacy. the president's maximum political power and validation is right now in this moment and in the next year, and the question is, did he strike while the iron is hot, and take to the tendency which will be to appeal to the democratic base and try to ram something through, or does he do something which may be against his nature and try to reach out to republicans, work with maybe marco rubio on immigration, and try to have a real legacy. >> i think your former boss saying, i have political capital to spend and i'm going to spend it. do you see the same for president obama? >> i do. and the interesting thing is, mandates are that which you create as the president. you can create more and do more if you do well. if the economy comes back and you can convince people t
of illinois, that will have a whole bunch of american flags on it, not to mention the civil rights float that's going to be here, the mlk float, a lot of people just very excited. we are pleased, very happy, relieved that it was not like four years ago where it was freezing cold, but still a lot of folks who are coming in. they're bundled up. they're ready to go. soledad? >> suzanne, it's very interesting. i remember four years ago when i was sitting next to david gergen, presidential adviser, and when the motorcade was going down the parade route, and then it stopped, and president obama and the first lady got out of their car. he was really stressed by that. he was almost, i think it's fair to say, in a panic. he was so nervous because, of course, he was just worried. worried about the security, worried about the nation's first black president who had been sworn in, and i remember that moment when they finally got back in the car, he breathed a sigh of relief, kind of slumped in his chair, and said, oh, i'm so glad that moment is over. for secret service, i would imagine too, the same feeli
state senate. virginia republicans waited until this one particular democratic senator, a noted civil rights lawyer named henry marsh, they waited until senator marsh left town on monday for the day to go to the inauguration of president obama. virginia republicans had to wait until he was gone because the state senate is equally divided in virginia, 20 republicans and 20 democrats. but with henry marsh gone for the day, it's no longer an even divide, right? it's 20-19. with that advantage, republicans decided to spring on the senate and spring on the entire state a whole new set of redmaps. a whole new set of gerrymandered maps for the state, drafted to put republicans in charge in virginia effectively permanently. because they did it when henry marsh was away, republicans succeeded in this plan by one vote. in their stealth attack to change the maps. that one vote was the missing vote of the senator who had gone to the inauguration. that's how they started the week. now virginia republicans are moving on to the next part of it. they're moving on to the electoral college scheme part
takes legislation that kennedy introduced, that was stalled, really was not going to pass, civil rights, the tax cut bill, and, in an instant, johnson gets it moving towards passage. >> thank you very much. >> chris: last fall, he took part in a library of congress book festival, on the national mall. and it was clear he made johnson come alive for many readers. >> chris: do you like him? >> i don't like him or dislike him, you are in awe of him because you are constantly saying, look what he's doing now! >> chris: he got excited talking about johnson's rist, as we tur book, he's writing now, about johnson's presidency and vietnam, his demeanor suddenly changed. >> the story is going to turn very dark as soon as vietnam enters the picture. it is sort of a tragic story. a story of his great dreams, that are destroyed by a war. >> chris: you are 76 now. do you ever worry that you are not going to have time to finish the last book? >> well, sure! but, you know, it is not productive to think like that. >> chris: how long do you think it will take you to finish? >> i could say three or four
history. the pioneers went over the rocky mountains. we got through world war ii. we did the civil rights movement. they did it, not we. i mean we that's the whole point. the civil rights movement the gay rights movement the womens movement came from below and leaders responded. it's never coming from the top down. usually change comes from the bottom up. that's where the we is. >> lincoln's second inaugural address was something like 701 words or something. i believe he used the word "i" once in the speech. so could a president these days give a 700-word inaugural address? please? >> we would love it. that means you have to have that poetic compression. linkeningen linkcoln was a writer that knew how to make these things little. we would have to talk more. oh my god. >> doris, let me ask you a question. i want to follow up on this but i want to make sure it's a fair thing to ask. that's the great they think about "morning joe." >> uh-oh. here he goes. >> the great thing about "morning joe" is -- >> what are you doing? >> we fly without -- >> are you thinking? >> we ign
passage of the historic civil rights laws. we are honored to have with us a colleague, congressman john lewis, a speaker at that historic march. [applause] ongressman lewis' life exemplifies the courage and sacrifice that has made our nation great. please stand and take about what so we can all recognize you. [applause] -- take a bow so that we can all srecognize you. behind us, the painting we have chosen for this luncheon is at niagara falls. 6.is was painted in 1850 sike for me, niagara falls never fails to inspire a tremendous all of the natural beauty of our country. then and now, the mighty falls symbolize the grandeur, power, and possibility of america. i want to thank my former senate partner, hillary clinton for allowing us to borrow this beautiful painting from the state department collection. [applause] but frankly, we are not here for the paintings, we are here for the food. while the theme of today's ceremony is based in america's future, today's menu could be labeled face in america's food. from the new england lobster, to the south dakota bison, to the wonderful new york
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)